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Female momentum in U.S. politics

Women Running for Political Office – 2018 Snapshot

August 22, 2018    
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After the 2016 Election, women across the country began to take a more active role in public life. From the Women’s March and the #MeToo movement, to the high-profile female candidacies across the country, there seems to be a surge in female participation in U.S. politics. With the midterm elections fast approaching, we decided to take a look at our data to determine whether there really is a positive trend in female participation.

We took a sample of five states from different regions of the United States and analyzed the demographics of candidates who are running in this year’s November general election (or who won their primary and/or are otherwise unopposed) versus the same state’s 2016 candidate profile.

2016 vs. 2018: Candidates by Sex

STATEPERCENTAGE OF FEMALE CANDIDATES (2016)PERCENTAGE OF FEMALE CANDIDATES (2018)
SAMPLE AVERAGE30.51%38.21%
Indiana23.81%37.51%
Maryland39.00%36.34%
Minnesota29.01%32.41%
Oregon27.51%43.00%
Texas33.24%38.31%

The Women’s March was largely in support of traditional progressive values and many high profile female politicians are Democrats. Therefore, it may be no great surprise that 43% of Democratic candidates are female compared to just 34% of Republican candidates.

We’re interested to see how the past two years of female momentum effects the outcomes of the General Election, and are also looking forward to seeing if this has any impact on female turnout come November.